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We Need to Talk: Communicating with Your Child’s Teacher

We Need to TalkOne of the most important things you can do for your child in school is to communicate well with their teacher. The teacher will typically let you know how they prefer to communicate with you – by telephone, email, or even text. Feel free to let them know your preferred method of communication as well. Teachers are usually very happy to work with you, as they value that communication as much as you do.

Try to make it to open-house night and conferences. The more face-to-face time you have with your child’s teacher, the easier it is to develop a relationship that makes it easier to talk when the tough conversations come up.

Speaking of tough conversations, always try to remember that what your child tells you happened in school may be a misinterpretation or simple confusion. For instance, your child may come home crying that they didn’t get to go out to recess and while your first reaction is to get upset as well, you should find out the facts. Check with your child’s teacher and calmly ask them to tell you more about the children staying in. That’s may be when you find out that the teacher was asked to keep the kids in for their safety, as bees nests were being removed. Your child didn’t know that was the reason because they were in the restroom when the teacher explained it to the class.

Remember, your children will be watching how you communicate with their teacher. Talking and meeting often, and responding calmly and finding out the facts, will show your children how to be effective communicators throughout their

and while your first reaction is to get upset as well, you should find out the facts. Check with your child’s teacher and calmly ask them to tell you more about the children staying in. That’s may be when you find out that the teacher was asked to keep the kids in for their safety, as bees nests were being removed. Your child didn’t know that was the reason because they were in the restroom when the teacher explained it to the class.

Remember, your children will be watching how you communicate with their teacher. Talking and meeting often, and responding calmly and finding out the facts, will show your children how to be effective communicators throughout their lives.

 

Nancy Keaton

Nancy is the Program Manager of Child & Family Studies at Centralia College.

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