Tag Archives: parenting

Happy Holiday's Star

Handling Holidays After Divorce

The holidays can be a particularly difficult time when a couple has divorced. Old memories, good and bad, fun and painful, can be brought to the forefront this time of year. But even though things change, there are always ways to make it work, and to teach your children about handling change. The biggest factor that impacts how it will work out is our attitude. Choosing to make the best of the new situation is the approach most likely to work best for your children as well as yourself. There are some options to choose from on how to spend the day: Split the day: One parent spends Thanksgiving morning with the children, the other parent spends the afternoon or evening. Alternate years: One parent has the children on even years, the other on odd years. Choose a different day: One parent has the children on the holiday, the other ...
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Nightmare be Gone

Nightmares Be Gone!

As we get closer to Halloween, it’s exciting to plan all the “scary” fun and games. But for some children, this time of year can set off nightmares or make them worse. Here are some tips for helping your child handle nightmares: If they need to talk, let them talk while you just listen. While some believe talking about the dream can make it more vivid, it can also allow a child to realize how unrealistic the dream was so there really is no chance of it actually happening. You will know whether your child needs to talk or prefers not to. After they have talked, subtly change the topic to something fun, such as the vacation you took last summer, or are planning next year.  Favorite objects such as a stuffed toy or a blanket can give a child a sense of security and help ease fears to overcome ...
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We Need to Talk

We Need to Talk: Communicating with Your Child’s Teacher

One of the most important things you can do for your child in school is to communicate well with their teacher. The teacher will typically let you know how they prefer to communicate with you – by telephone, email, or even text. Feel free to let them know your preferred method of communication as well. Teachers are usually very happy to work with you, as they value that communication as much as you do. Try to make it to open-house night and conferences. The more face-to-face time you have with your child’s teacher, the easier it is to develop a relationship that makes it easier to talk when the tough conversations come up. Speaking of tough conversations, always try to remember that what your child tells you happened in school may be a misinterpretation or simple confusion. For instance, your child may come home crying that they didn’t get to ...
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The 7 C's of Resilience

Navigating “The 7 Cs of Parenting”: Conclusion

Navigating the 7 Cs of parenting, you can help your child become competent and confident.  They will build social connections needed for them to develop a strong character while they make positive contributions to society.  They will learn that they are valuable.  They learn that their decisions and actions are important, because they affect everyone around them. Children who know how to cope with the challenges and changes in life not only make good role models, they are the builders of our future society.  They have control of their own destinies, and they show others a better way to conduct themselves.  Their resilience is exemplary. This is the final article in our 9-part series on the 7 Cs of Resilience. Make sure to check out our other posts if you missed any of the steps. You'll learn what the Cs are, and how to encourage your child along each path ...
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The 7 C's of Resilience

Navigating “The 7 Cs of Parenting”: 7) Control

When children realize they are responsible for the outcome of their actions, they are likely to look at their choices and options more carefully and follow each one of them to the logical and final concision. This helps them to make healthy choices, where they can control the outcome of their own actions and decisions. When parents control all of their children's decisions, they deny their children the opportunity to learn self control. These children may feel like everything happens to them, and they can become passive and pessimistic. These children are inclined to become depressed because they see "control" as being an external factor, and they don't feel they have any control. On the other hand, resilient children internalize their decisions and know they have control over what happens to them.  These children know that the quality of their lives directly depends on the actions and decisions they make.  ...
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